Friday, May 4, 2012

Photographing Movement

Last week I played around with my home made neutral density filter. This filter allows me to show movement in my photographs--even in photographs captured in the middle of the day--because it increases the necessary exposure by 12 or 13 stops.

I love capturing movement, which is much different than stopping movement. Almost always, a photograph is the capturing of a micro-second of time. All motion is frozen. To be able to show a little of that movement is an amazing thing.

Besides clouds and water, anything that moves can be captured in motion using a slow shutter speed. It's fun to experiment with!
Circle K - Tehachapi, California
Shutter 13 seconds (hand-held, using the car's window as a mono pod), f8, ISO 200, Samsung NX200, 35mm equivalent.

Oak Tree - Keene, California
Shutter 30 seconds (tripod used), f11, ISO 400, Samsung NX200, 50mm equivalent.

Highway And Hills - Bealville, California
Shutter 25 seconds (tripod used), f13, ISO 400, Samsung NX200, 55mm equivalent.

Ghostly Kern River - Lake Isabella, California
Shutter 13 seconds (tripod used), f11, ISO 400, Samsung NX200, 50mm equivalent.

Heavenly River - Lake Isabella, California
Shutter 20 seconds (tripod used), f8, ISO 400, Samsung NX200, 45mm equivalent.

Radioactive River - Lake Isabella, California
Shutter 30 seconds (tripod used), f10, ISO 400, Samsung NX200, 25mm equivalent.
The home made ND filter gives a very yellow hue to the images, which can be corrected by adjusting the white balance. Since I specifically wanted black-and-white images, I didn't worry about the white balance. This frame, for whatever reason, also had some red and green casts in it, which I thought were pretty cool. So I kept this one color.

Silky River - Lake Isabella, California
Shutter 30 seconds (tripod used), f8, ISO 400, Samsung NX200, 45mm equivalent.
Three Rocks - Lake Isabella, California
Shutter 30 seconds (tripod used), f9, ISO 400, Samsung NX200, 45mm equivalent.
Kern River Mist - Lake Isabella, California
Shutter 75 seconds (tripod used), f9, ISO 400, Samsung NX200, 60mm equivalent. 

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